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Refrigerated Trailer for Rent in St. George, SC

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You can think of refrigerated trailer rentals almost like a limousine service for your perishable items. In a limo, you get VIP treatment and stylish travel. In an ice truck rental, luxury and style are replaced with plenty of room, accessible storage, and a temperature-controlled environment. These features keep your cargo cool and protected from outdoor elements like rain, sleet, and snow, so you can make sure your items arrive on time when you need them.

You may be wondering to yourself, "Refrigerated trailer rentals sound like the perfect fit for my business. But how do I find them in South Carolina?" The easy answer to that question is to call Charleston Refrigerators Trailers - the Lowcountry's premier choice for high-quality refrigerated trailers and ice truck rentals.

Every one of our refrigerated trailer rentals are:

  • Delivered and Set Up for You
  • Cleaned and Sanitized After Each Customer
  • Pre-Cooled for Your Convenience When Feasible
  • Pre-Equipped with Adjustable Temperature Options
  • Safe, Secure, and Easy to Use

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Top Refrigerated Trailers Company St. George, SC

What Makes St. George Refrigerated Trailer Different?

At CRT, we believe that renting a refrigerated trailer is about more than simply having a quality cooling unit. Unlike some refrigerated trailer rental companies, we incorporate friendly, helpful customer service into every transaction we complete. That way, our clients know that they're in good hands every time they call our office and have peace of mind that their business won't suffer due to lack of communication.

We also make it a point to be flexible for our customers and strive to go the extra mile for them to make their jobs and lives easier. Need power cords to hook up your ice truck for rent in St. George? No problem, we can make that happen. Need to pick up one of our refrigerated trailer rentals yourself so you can deliver your own goods? We'd be happy to make arrangements so you can do so. Worried about the overnight security of your temperature-sensitive items? We're delighted to provide a padlock for extra security.

When you boil it down to the basics, St. George Refrigerated Trailer has become successful in South Carolina because we truly care about our customer's needs and go out of our way to ensure those needs are met.

We offer trailer rentals for both refrigerators and freezers, which are perfect for a number of industries and uses, including the following:

  • Catering Companies
  • Restaurants
  • Festivals
  • Family Reunions
  • Large Gatherings
  • Events
  • Parties
  • Weddings
  • Remote Refrigerated Storage Needs
  • Refrigerated Transportation
  • Rehearsals
  • Emergencies

About Our Refrigerated Trailers for Rent in South Carolina

At Charleston Refrigerators Trailers, all of our mobile rentals are well-built and crafted with a seamless fiberglass design for both reliability and refrigeration efficiency. When you make arrangements to have an ice truck for rent in St. George delivered or picked up, you'll enjoy a range of helpful trailer features, including the following:

  • Each Trailer Comes in a 6x16 Size
  • Four-Inch Walls for Structural Rigidity and Cool Air Retention
  • 54-Inch Reinforced Doors for Easy Loading and Enhanced Safety
  • Pellet-Duty Floor for Ease of Convenience

Cooling and freezing take place reliably with an integrated GOVI Arktik 2000US series refrigeration unit. These compact units provide a temperature range of 0 to 50 degrees F, are all-electric, and only require 110V and 15 amps. Since our coolers have the capability of maintaining temps both below and above 32 degrees Fahrenheit, our ice truck rentals double as both freezers and coolers. This handy feature makes them a more convenient and robust tool for your personal or business needs versus other mobile cooler rentals in St. George.

With CRT by your side, there's no need to rent separate ice trucks or mobile refrigerators because our unit is 2-in-1, saving you both time and money.

How Does a Refrigerated Trailer for Rent in St. George Work?

Generally speaking, refrigerated trailers aren't meant to cool down or freeze the items stored within them. Instead, they're meant to keep products at a specific temperature for a certain amount of time. At Charleston Refrigerators Trailers, our team members use Polar King Mobile trailers. We made the choice to use this brand for a reason: These ice trucks both meet and exceed all compliance guidelines set forth by the NATM or National Association of Trailer Manufacturers.

Our refrigerated trailers for rent utilize three major components:

Compressor

Compressor

When the compressor is powered correctly, it draws in refrigerant and then compresses it. Once the refrigerant is compressed, it becomes liquified and is passed along to the trailer's condenser.

Condenser

Condenser

After the gas is compressed by the compressor, it is passed on to the condenser for a heat exchange process. The condenser fan allows outside air to flow through, leading to the dissipation of heat and a decrease in the refrigerant's temperature. This cooling process results in the refrigerant condensing from hot gas to regular-temperature liquid.

Evaporator

Evaporator

The evaporator receives the liquid refrigerant through an expansion valve that regulates its flow and cooling. The refrigerant transforms into a cool liquid as it passes through the valve, then expands and turns into a warm gas in the evaporator. This gas absorbs the heat and air inside the container and is then drawn into the compressor to restart the cycle.

St. George Refrigerated Trailer Pro Tip:

Refrigeration units can run in cycles or continuously. Running the refrigeration unit in cycles reduces fuel consumption but creates more temperature variation. Frozen foods are less sensitive to temperature changes and can endure these variations. Continuous cooling is better suited for products and goods that are not able to withstand temperature variations well. At Charleston Refrigerators Trailers, our mobile rental options utilize continuous cooling to ensure your items don't suffer from temperature variations.

5 Benefits of Using an Ice Truck for Rent in St. George

For business owners, managing funds and staying on top of costs is a crucial part of owning a profitable company. Purchasing and maintaining a fleet of refrigerated trailers can be a significant financial burden, requiring substantial capital investment and ongoing maintenance costs. However, renting refrigerated trucks can help businesses allocate their funds more wisely.

That's especially true for businesses that do not frequently engage in long-distance refrigerated shipping. Why purchase an entire vehicle and refrigeration system when you need the trailer for more minor tasks, like delivering flowers on Valentine's Day or storing products after an unexpected power outage? If you have a specific product line or a limited-time special, it's more practical to go with a refrigerated truck for rent than to purchase an ice truck outright.

In terms of the additional benefits of refrigerated trailer rentals, there's no shortage of them to highlight:

 Refrigerated Trailers St. George, SC
 Remote Refrigerated Storage St. George, SC
  • 01 No Maintenance Costs When you rent a refrigerated trailer, one of the biggest benefits is that you don't have to worry about expensive maintenance and repairs. If you were to buy a unit, it would only be a matter of time before you or a qualified professional would have to make repairs. At St. George Refrigerated Trailer, all of our trailer rental options are well-maintained and up-to-date on repairs and updates.
  • 02 Cost-Effective When you buy an ice truck, you're making a long-term investment that may take a long time to pay off. When you rent, you're getting an immediate solution, which is better for your bank account when you only need the trailer for an abbreviated time.
  • 03 No Storage Costs What many folks don't think about when they buy a refrigerated trailer is that they will need someplace to store it when it's not in use. Often, that means paying even more money to rent a storage unit. With a refrigerated trailer for rent in St. George, you can eliminate the expenses associated with storage units.
  • 04 Focus on Day-to-Day Business Obligations With an ice truck rental, you can concentrate on your core business activities instead of allocating resources towards managing a fleet of trucks and dealing with all the logistics involved.
  • 05 Refrigerated Space Catered to Your Needs Renting a refrigerated trailer from CRT means you have the flexibility of booking a short or longer-term trailer rental. That can be very helpful, especially for growing businesses and events that might have changing needs from month to month.

St. George Refrigerated Trailer Pro Tip

 Refrigerated Transportation St. George, SC

Looking for a spot to practice towing and trailering? Practicing these maneuvers in an empty parking lot is an excellent idea. It's always better to learn the movements of your trailer in empty spaces, so you can avoid any mishaps like trying to back up and park in front of a busy store.

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Refrigerated Trailer FAQs

At St. George Refrigerated Trailer, we're big proponents of giving our customers plenty of information. That way, they can make informed purchasing decisions and know how to better operate our ice truck rentals. To keep yourself educated, keep these FAQs in mind:

  • Q. Does CRT provide power cords for refrigerated trailer rentals? a. 1 - 100ft Cord Provided.
  • Q. What type of plug do I need for towing your trailer? a. You'll need a regular 120v plug within 100 feet of the trailer
  • Q. Is it OK to store goods in the trailer rental? a. Yes, absolutely. We'll even provide you with a padlock for extra safety!
  • Q. Do I have to clean up when I'm done using the refrigerated trailer rental? a. Nope! Once you return your rental or we pick it up, we'll clean and sanitize the unit from head to toe.
  • Q. I need both a freezer and a refrigerated trailer rental. Can you help? a. Our refrigerated trailer rentals are both coolers AND freezers. Depending on your requirements, we can regulate the temperature from 0 to 50 degrees F.

The Top Choice for Refrigerated Trailer Rentals in South Carolina

Renting a refrigerated trailer just makes good sense for many businesses in St. George and the metro area. That's why St. George Refrigerated Trailer proudly serves South Carolina and the Lowcountry with refrigerated and frozen transportation rentals. If you're looking for the reliability, convenience, flexibility, and cost-effectiveness of a refrigerated trailer for rent in St. George, look no further than CRT.

phone (843) 296-6617

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Latest News in St. George, SC

St. George restaurant marries faith, family and food

ST. GEORGE — Sweeping the floor following the lunch rush at Nannie’s Kitchen, Sherrie Benson sings along to “It Matters to the Master” by Southern Gospel group The Collingsworth Family.By the time the small St. George restaurant has closed at 3 p.m., Benson has been hard at work for close to 12 hours, baking off biscuits and muffins in the wee hours of the morning. Later in the early evening on this Monday, she will lead a Bible st...

ST. GEORGE — Sweeping the floor following the lunch rush at Nannie’s Kitchen, Sherrie Benson sings along to “It Matters to the Master” by Southern Gospel group The Collingsworth Family.

By the time the small St. George restaurant has closed at 3 p.m., Benson has been hard at work for close to 12 hours, baking off biscuits and muffins in the wee hours of the morning. Later in the early evening on this Monday, she will lead a Bible study at the restaurant she opened with her husband Shane in November 2021. The group of about a dozen women planned to discuss a book titled, “Twelve Extraordinary Women: How God Shaped Women of the Bible, and What He Wants to Do with You.”

Some restaurants feel like they’ve been around for decades, even if they haven’t. Nannie’s Kitchen, located at 307 North Parler Ave. just under one hour from downtown Charleston, is one of those places.

Homegrown knickknacks fill the walls, from coffee mugs to children’s soccer jerseys. By the door, there is a photo of Edna, or Nannie, Benson’s grandmother and the inspiration for the small restaurant. Edna was a praying grandmother who helped get Benson through tough times, she told me after I recently visited Nannie’s for lunch.

After placing my order for the barbecue sandwich with mustard sauce, I turned my attention to the baked goods case, which Benson later told me was decimated from a busy weekend. There was still more than enough to choose from, including apple fritters, blueberry muffins and a chocolate-covered cake pop with a delightfully unexpected strawberry filling. In addition to the baked goods, Nannie’s Kitchen serves breakfast sandwiches, soups, salads, meatloaf, grilled pimento cheese, hot dogs, Hershey’s Ice Cream and more.

Food first connected Sherrie and Shane when they met, but opening a restaurant only became a reality when they moved to St. George from Summerville in 2020. The couple fell in love with the calm streets and friendly neighbors in their new South Carolina home, a place that felt more comfortable than a rapidly developing Summerville.

Growing pains may hit St. George with proposed 'cluster' housing development

ST. GEORGE — The tiny town in northwest Dorchester County might be getting some new next-door neighbors, and more, in one residential influx than it has ever seen before.If approved by the county, a "cluster" housing development proposed by the D.R. Horton, a national builder, would bring more than 330 new homes and a new zoning designation for roughly 300 rural acres near the "Town of Friendly People."Business...

ST. GEORGE — The tiny town in northwest Dorchester County might be getting some new next-door neighbors, and more, in one residential influx than it has ever seen before.

If approved by the county, a "cluster" housing development proposed by the D.R. Horton, a national builder, would bring more than 330 new homes and a new zoning designation for roughly 300 rural acres near the "Town of Friendly People."

Business

While the development would land on Sugar Hill Road outside town limits, St. George would provide water to the development while Dorchester County Water and Sewer would provide sewer services, said Kiera Reinertsen, the county's planning director. The development would also add an estimated 100 students to Dorchester School District Four and draw on services and amenities from St. George’s Fire Station Nine, Davis-Bailey Park and the town’s library.

“We’ve never had this many houses come in at one time since I’ve been here,” said Mayor Kevin Hart, who has lived in the town for 35 years.

The 2.8-square-mile town is home to roughly 1,800 residents, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. Now the county seat, St. George was originally called George’s Station as a stop along the South Carolina Railroad, now Norfolk Southern. It was incorporated in 1875.

“We haven’t had a housing development like this in this area before. There’s no way we can stop them, but we have to make plans. We won’t know it works until we see how it goes,” Hart said. "... Some want to keep our small-town feeling. It’s a tough battle, and we knew it was coming. You can see the progress coming all way up Highway 78. Harleyville is having the same challenge as St. George.

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“We’ve got to hope and pray our best laid plans go well for our little town.”

Described as “America’s largest home builder” on its web site, with operations in 45 markets nationwide and 1 million homes constructed since its inception in 1978, D.R. Horton wants to change zoning for the property for the proposed development from agricultural residential, which allows one-acre home lots, to single family residential (R-1), which reduces lot sizes to a third of an acre.

The cluster concept proposed relies on meeting the greenspace requirement by using that of an old golf club adjacent to the property to be developed. Members of the county’s Planning, Development and Building (PDB) Committee reviewed the request for information only on Jan. 8.

In an R-1 zone, said Reinertsen, there is a requirement that 30 percent of developable acreage be conserved as open space and 20 to 25 percent of that is required to be usable open space.

“Cluster developments allow for smaller lot size but preserve greater areas of open space. I believe that the intent is that a lot of that golf course area or all of it will remain open space. I believe they are looking to develop 338 homes over the next 4 to 5 years,” Reinertsen explained during the committee meeting.

“The services are in place to support a development like this.”

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He didn’t disagree with the services available to the development, but PDB chairman and County Councilman David Chinnis took issue with two other factors in the cluster proposal. One point of contention Chinnis raised was the development’s cluster design, which he said not only depends on a housing community having accessible green space nearby, but also that the green space is developable.

“I see some open space that is created as open space because the development possibilities are nearly zero, because of the disconnect from the property. I need to know how they intend to connect it. If they’re getting credit for open space, I expect it to be something that is usable, not just something that is imaginary. Cluster ordinance benefits only really apply if it’s developable green space,” said Chinnis, explaining later to The Post and Courier that the spirit of the county’s cluster development ordinance was to create something similar to community pocket parks.

The benefit to homeowners is green space around their homes, he said, while the benefit to the developer is that it costs less to install utilities when homes are closer together.

D.R. Horton’s proposal still must clear several more bureaucratic hurdles, including a second review by the PDB with a vote, and three readings with votes by the full County Council.

The proposal is only conceptual at this stage, Reinertsen assured the PDB members. The planning department had not received a submittal at the time of the Jan. 8 meeting.

“They’ll have to show me green space access that a neighbor isn’t going to be able to build a fence across,” Chinnis said.

The second point of contention the PDB chairman made was about the lack of traffic-calming measures included in the proposal.

“There are zero traffic calming measures in here. There’s zero. ... There are no splitter islands, roundabouts or anything,” Chinnis said during the meeting.

He later emphasized the county has found that speed bumps don’t make effective traffic control measures in residential communities.

“There’s things they’ll have to incorporate into the design. They may have to drop a few home lots to make it all work,” Chinnis said. “Landowners may have property rights, but land developers have property responsibilities to the community where they are building.”

Rosenwald students recall struggles and hope at reopening of St. George school

An historic school built for African Americans in 1925 is restored and reopened in St. George, S.C. as a community center and museum. It will share the stories of those who created it and were educated there. Painted bright white with a red, tin roof, the St. George Rosenwald school in Dorchester County looks new. Inside, former student Clara Britt is excited to sit behind a small, wooden desk again.“I never thought that this would happen,” says Britt, giggling like a schoolgirl. She’s about to turn 102-year...

An historic school built for African Americans in 1925 is restored and reopened in St. George, S.C. as a community center and museum. It will share the stories of those who created it and were educated there.

Painted bright white with a red, tin roof, the St. George Rosenwald school in Dorchester County looks new. Inside, former student Clara Britt is excited to sit behind a small, wooden desk again.

“I never thought that this would happen,” says Britt, giggling like a schoolgirl. She’s about to turn 102-years-old.

Sitting beside Britt is former classmate Ordie Brown. He’s 94-years-old and met his wife here.

“She was taking home economics,” says Brown. “They were practicing how to cook. She would give me lunch out the window.”

Brown and Britt are reunited for the reopening of the historic St. George school. After years of fundraising, planning and construction, the restored schoolhouse will now serve as a community center and museum, sharing the story of African Americans denied an education and the hope they found in schools like St. George Rosenwald.

Built in 1925, the schoolhouse is known as a Rosenwald school because it was funded in part by Julius Rosenwald. He was the son of Jewish immigrants who became the president of Sears, Roebuck and Company.

Rosenwald met educator Booker T. Washington in 1911. The founder of the Tuskegee Institute believed education was the key to African Americans breaking free from generations of oppression.

Together, the wealthy business owner and the educator born into slavery, set out to build schools for Black children.

At the time, 90% of African Americans lived in the South. Yet, schools for Blacks were just shacks with merely a fraction of the funding as White schools, if they existed at all.

Rosenwald offered to match funding in Black communities that raised money for schools and got the support of local white schoolboards. The idea was to get communities to work together.

Black families, already paying taxes for white schools, struggled, but came up with the money. They knew education could be life changing.

“If you’re a parent who can’t read or write, you want your kids to be able to that,” says former state Sen. John Matthews.

Matthews is grateful for the education he received at a Rosenwald school in Bowen, S.C. He helped raise money for the St. George restoration.

Between 1917 and 1932, roughly 5,000 Rosenwald schools were built, educating more than 600,000 Black children. Their graduates include civil right activists like Medgar Evers, John Lewis, and Maya Angelou.

Today, 500 Rosenwald schoolhouses remain but many are in disrepair. Former students like Ralph James want to save them.

“We see the progress, that in spite of these things, we tell the story of how persons made it,” says James. “How they were successful in life.”

A retired municipal judge, James attended the St. George school until it closed in 1954. He’s made it his mission to resurrect the schoolhouse and proudly gave a tour during its reopening earlier this month.

James says the six-teacher schoolhouse is one of the largest in the state, repurposed with electricity and bathrooms, amenities that did not exist when he was a student. He points to potbelly stoves and brick chimneys that warmed children who often had to walk miles because there were no school buses for Black children. And, like most Rosenwald schools, the building features tall windows with classrooms strategically placed.

“Because they had no light, they had no power and they didn’t want shadows on their desks,” explains Micah Thompson with the Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina, which helped with the restoration.

Congressman Jim Clyburn joined the tour as a special guest during the reopening. His late wife graduated from a Rosenwald School. He said preserving them pays tribute.

“Making sure that we honor the blood, sweat and tears of those who made this community what it is today.”

The congressman helped celebrate Brown and Britt as members of the school’s first graduating class. Brown spoke about playing basketball for the school with the team making a big tournament. But they’d only played on a dirt court.

“We went to the white high school and asked to practice on a wood floor,” said Brown. “But we were told no.”

Britt, meantime, was smitten with Clyburn.

“I had no idea I would ever meet you,” she said.

But Britt took issue with a banner that read she and Brown graduated in 1950.

“Our class is the class of 49. So, I would like them to change that sign,” said Britt as a roomful of guests erupted in laughter.

And, who’s going to argue? Britt is known as the student who once rode an ox to school to maintain her perfect attendance.

Historic Rosenwald School to inspire exploration, learning as Children's Museum expands

ST. GEORGE — Four former classrooms in the historic Rosenwald School in St. George will once again become a place to teach young minds as the space becomes the Children’s Museum of the Lowcountry’s first — but not last — satellite location out...

ST. GEORGE — Four former classrooms in the historic Rosenwald School in St. George will once again become a place to teach young minds as the space becomes the Children’s Museum of the Lowcountry’s first — but not last — satellite location outside of Charleston.

The renovated St. George Rosenwald school is one of about 500 in the state and one of nearly 5,000 in the South, all constructed in the early 1900s. Those who have rallied behind preserving the school envision it becoming the community center of the town. It reopened to the public in August.

When it was built in 1925, it was a six-teacher school dedicated to educating African American children. Now, the north wing of the H-shaped building will take on a new life educating future generations as an extension of the Children's Museum of the Lowcountry.

A new museum

The approximately 2,500 square-foot space within the Rosenwald School will feature a tinker lab with hands-on exhibits to explore engineering concepts; a child-sized grocery store where children can learn about nutrition, commerce and money; a space that can promote visual and performing arts; and classroom space for educational programs or field trip groups. It is expected to open in spring 2024.

Karen Coltrane, CML’s president and CEO, called it a "natural extension of our efforts to serve the greater Lowcountry" outside of its downtown Charleston location.

Coltrane said it’s about teaching kids basic concepts that they can connect to real-world situations. For example, a child may see the apple tree and grocery area in the new exhibit, and the next time they are at the store with a parent, they can understand apples come from trees and that people buy apples at the store with money.

“Making those kinds of connections are vital in early development,” Coltrane said. “It’s easier to get them excited about science and learning when they’re little instead of trying to spark it later.”

The milestone marks the nation's first adaptive reuse of a Rosenwald School as a children's museum satellite. It's the starting point for the museum's plans to expand to more rural areas of the Lowcountry.

“It’s going to be a game-changer in expanding access to museum resources for school field trips,” Coltrane said. “By the time you load up a bunch of kids from these more rural areas and bring them downtown, they don’t have a lot of time to spend at the museum itself. This would give them more hands-on access closer to home.”

Connecting past with present

Ralph James, chairman of the board that operates the Rosenwald school, called the restored building the “jewel of the community.”

“It has always been the desire of the community and alumni of the school to see it restored,” James said. “The original effort of the school was built on the foundation of an opportunity to empower members of our community to be able to increase their educational pursuits. We look forward to offering cultural enrichment to the community once again and again charging students with the task to be all that they can be.”

Revitalizing the school has been more than a decade in the making.

Coltrane had taken a tour of the Rosenwald building in 2015 with then-state Rep. Patsy Knight. At the time it was shuttered, shrubs were overgrown and the weatherworn building was not in great shape, Coltrane recalled. She was leading EdVenture in Columbia, scouting for a potential secondary location. While it didn’t pan out, it ignited the idea for the historic building's potential to become a museum outpost.

Coltrane had moved on to other ventures before returning to the Palmetto State to lead the Children's Museum in downtown Charleston. During her second week on the job, Ralph James, board director of the Rosenwald School, called her asking if a children’s museum satellite post was still on the table. Her immediate answer was yes.

While grants and donations are funding the buildout of the project, Coltrane hopes to secure federal and state funding to operate it in the short term. Ultimately, the goal is to open another satellite location in Dorchester County that could help offset operating costs for the Rosenwald location.

The Children’s Museum downtown sees roughly 130,000 visitors per year. The museum is currently trying to raise $4 million to revamp the downtown location. While expanding the downtown location is out of the question, Coltrane hopes they can reconfigure and maximize the space with new and refreshed exhibits.

“Because we operate within the constrictions of a historic building, the only way to grow is to make the best of the space we have and add additional locations,” Coltrane said.

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Investing in the future

The project was funded through investments totaling $300,000 made by Boeing Co. and other local philanthropists.

Erin Fisher, a senior manager for the 787 maker's community engagement efforts, said that efforts to develop a workforce pipeline can't just target high school and college-age students. She said it starts by pushing children to embrace problem-solving and science- and math-based concepts, with the hope that it will set them down a career path in advanced manufacturing or engineering, she said.

“Our work with the Children's Museum is a way to support education from cradle to career,” she said. “This is an opportunity to engage with students on the early childhood level to spark the curiosity that leads to an innovative mindset. That is what we're looking for in our workforce and teammates here at Boeing South Carolina.”

Over the last five years, Boeing has donated $925,000 toward the museum's makerspace, pop-up tinker shop and mobile STEM lab programs that expand the museum’s outreach beyond Charleston county.

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Mission first

Coltrane said that she is proud that the first satellite location is driven by being of service to the community rather than revenue generation.

“Mission and margin drive each other forward, but growth is not just defined by the bottom line," Coltrane said. "The priority now is to see growth in the number of children we can reach across the Lowcountry and the types of services we can offer them outside of our downtown hub.”

James hailed the project as an example of the good that can come from public-private partnerships, when the community, town, county, public officials and companies unite for the same goal.

“We are very fortunate to have a multiple-pronged approach to what we can offer,” James said. “We'll be able to demonstrate history from 1925 through now. This place has always been about empowering our young folk, so now we're able to do the same thing, especially with the utilization of the Children's Museum.”

Visits to tour the historic classrooms are currently by appointment only. Once the museum outpost comes online, there will be more regular hours, according to James.

“Having a partner, purpose and a vision was the catalyst that got the movement going on this,” James said. “We hope that other rural areas and small towns will see the benefit of this and will duplicate the efforts happening here.”

First Look: The George and the Independent Arrive in Georgetown, South Carolina

The colonial seaport town gets a hotel and restaurant combo full of sweet homages to the communityFebruary 29, 2024 Updated March 1, 2024For over eighty years, a family-owned seafood market called Independent Seafood operated on Front Street in the colonial seaport town of Georgetown, South Carolina, serving fresh shrimp and fish to the community daily. Last year, it closed its doors—but two weeks ago, a new restaurant opened bea...

The colonial seaport town gets a hotel and restaurant combo full of sweet homages to the community

February 29, 2024 Updated March 1, 2024

For over eighty years, a family-owned seafood market called Independent Seafood operated on Front Street in the colonial seaport town of Georgetown, South Carolina, serving fresh shrimp and fish to the community daily. Last year, it closed its doors—but two weeks ago, a new restaurant opened bearing their name, housed in a new hotel, the George, that opens today.

“We wanted to be thoughtful about the history and the fabric of the community,” says Steve Palmer, the founder of Indigo Road, the hospitality group behind the new spot. “There’s certainly sadness when a local business like that closes, and we decided the best way to honor them was to call the restaurant the Independent.” The menu reflects the market’s history, too: Raw offerings like littleneck clams and oysters abound, plus larger plates including blackened flounder with a lump crab and andouille sausage perlo. “That blackened flounder is the best-selling dish in the two weeks we’ve been open,” Palmer says. “And the fried crab fingers are my other favorite.”

The hotel itself, with fifty-six rooms, features its own set of homages to Georgetown and the surrounding area; Charleston designer Jenny Keenan wanted to incorporate the history of the town and the environment into every detail. “We all wanted something that blended into the town and the landscape,” she says. “Pecky cypress wood was non negotiable. So were sweetgrass baskets and local art.” Below, look inside the hotel and the restaurant.

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“I always love to see the sweetgrass huts along Highway 17 as I drive from Charleston to Georgetown,” Keenan says. The team commissioned local Angela Manigault to make two large baskets to hang on the hotel wall as a nod to the regional art form.

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A seating area at the end of the hotel’s first-floor corridor features poppy patterns, a colorful tapestry from India, and framed insects. “Living with birds and butterflies and alligators is part of being in an area with so much greenspace,” Keenan says. “I added touches of the flora and fauna wherever I could.”

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From the lobby, guests can peek into the Independent and at a commissioned piece featuring a flying bull and fish. “We wanted the restaurant to feel distinct from the hotel,” Keenan says. “It has a nautical, throwback vibe, with merlot-colored walls and blues.”

Inside the Independent, the bar area features layered textures of leather, wood, and marble.

In the back hallway, this seating area incorporates a collection of found pieces. “We wanted it to feel old, so these items are from antique stores and flea markets,” Keenan says. The team dubbed the portrait of the woman Eliza, after Eliza Lucas Pinkney, an influential historical figure who brought indigo to the area—and they borrowed her name for the outdoor bar, as well.

The cypress wood paneling and floor covers the first-floor corridor, providing a backdrop for a whimsical piece of an alligator and mermaid by Charleston artist David Boatwright.

ANDREW CEBULKA

On the way to the hotel elevators from the lobby, guests pass under an archway, one of Keenan’s favorite structural details. “I wanted it to feel like you are walking through a forest,” she says.

Keenan also wanted the hotel to have an English feel, so she selected patterned wallpaper—in dark blue as a nod to the importance of the indigo industry to the area.

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