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Refrigerated Trailer for Rent in Sumter, SC

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You can think of refrigerated trailer rentals almost like a limousine service for your perishable items. In a limo, you get VIP treatment and stylish travel. In an ice truck rental, luxury and style are replaced with plenty of room, accessible storage, and a temperature-controlled environment. These features keep your cargo cool and protected from outdoor elements like rain, sleet, and snow, so you can make sure your items arrive on time when you need them.

You may be wondering to yourself, "Refrigerated trailer rentals sound like the perfect fit for my business. But how do I find them in South Carolina?" The easy answer to that question is to call Charleston Refrigerators Trailers - the Lowcountry's premier choice for high-quality refrigerated trailers and ice truck rentals.

Every one of our refrigerated trailer rentals are:

  • Delivered and Set Up for You
  • Cleaned and Sanitized After Each Customer
  • Pre-Cooled for Your Convenience When Feasible
  • Pre-Equipped with Adjustable Temperature Options
  • Safe, Secure, and Easy to Use

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Top Refrigerated Trailers Company Sumter, SC

What Makes Sumter Refrigerated Trailer Different?

At CRT, we believe that renting a refrigerated trailer is about more than simply having a quality cooling unit. Unlike some refrigerated trailer rental companies, we incorporate friendly, helpful customer service into every transaction we complete. That way, our clients know that they're in good hands every time they call our office and have peace of mind that their business won't suffer due to lack of communication.

We also make it a point to be flexible for our customers and strive to go the extra mile for them to make their jobs and lives easier. Need power cords to hook up your ice truck for rent in Sumter? No problem, we can make that happen. Need to pick up one of our refrigerated trailer rentals yourself so you can deliver your own goods? We'd be happy to make arrangements so you can do so. Worried about the overnight security of your temperature-sensitive items? We're delighted to provide a padlock for extra security.

When you boil it down to the basics, Sumter Refrigerated Trailer has become successful in South Carolina because we truly care about our customer's needs and go out of our way to ensure those needs are met.

We offer trailer rentals for both refrigerators and freezers, which are perfect for a number of industries and uses, including the following:

  • Catering Companies
  • Restaurants
  • Festivals
  • Family Reunions
  • Large Gatherings
  • Events
  • Parties
  • Weddings
  • Remote Refrigerated Storage Needs
  • Refrigerated Transportation
  • Rehearsals
  • Emergencies

About Our Refrigerated Trailers for Rent in South Carolina

At Charleston Refrigerators Trailers, all of our mobile rentals are well-built and crafted with a seamless fiberglass design for both reliability and refrigeration efficiency. When you make arrangements to have an ice truck for rent in Sumter delivered or picked up, you'll enjoy a range of helpful trailer features, including the following:

  • Each Trailer Comes in a 6x16 Size
  • Four-Inch Walls for Structural Rigidity and Cool Air Retention
  • 54-Inch Reinforced Doors for Easy Loading and Enhanced Safety
  • Pellet-Duty Floor for Ease of Convenience

Cooling and freezing take place reliably with an integrated GOVI Arktik 2000US series refrigeration unit. These compact units provide a temperature range of 0 to 50 degrees F, are all-electric, and only require 110V and 15 amps. Since our coolers have the capability of maintaining temps both below and above 32 degrees Fahrenheit, our ice truck rentals double as both freezers and coolers. This handy feature makes them a more convenient and robust tool for your personal or business needs versus other mobile cooler rentals in Sumter.

With CRT by your side, there's no need to rent separate ice trucks or mobile refrigerators because our unit is 2-in-1, saving you both time and money.

How Does a Refrigerated Trailer for Rent in Sumter Work?

Generally speaking, refrigerated trailers aren't meant to cool down or freeze the items stored within them. Instead, they're meant to keep products at a specific temperature for a certain amount of time. At Charleston Refrigerators Trailers, our team members use Polar King Mobile trailers. We made the choice to use this brand for a reason: These ice trucks both meet and exceed all compliance guidelines set forth by the NATM or National Association of Trailer Manufacturers.

Our refrigerated trailers for rent utilize three major components:

Compressor

Compressor

When the compressor is powered correctly, it draws in refrigerant and then compresses it. Once the refrigerant is compressed, it becomes liquified and is passed along to the trailer's condenser.

Condenser

Condenser

After the gas is compressed by the compressor, it is passed on to the condenser for a heat exchange process. The condenser fan allows outside air to flow through, leading to the dissipation of heat and a decrease in the refrigerant's temperature. This cooling process results in the refrigerant condensing from hot gas to regular-temperature liquid.

Evaporator

Evaporator

The evaporator receives the liquid refrigerant through an expansion valve that regulates its flow and cooling. The refrigerant transforms into a cool liquid as it passes through the valve, then expands and turns into a warm gas in the evaporator. This gas absorbs the heat and air inside the container and is then drawn into the compressor to restart the cycle.

Sumter Refrigerated Trailer Pro Tip:

Refrigeration units can run in cycles or continuously. Running the refrigeration unit in cycles reduces fuel consumption but creates more temperature variation. Frozen foods are less sensitive to temperature changes and can endure these variations. Continuous cooling is better suited for products and goods that are not able to withstand temperature variations well. At Charleston Refrigerators Trailers, our mobile rental options utilize continuous cooling to ensure your items don't suffer from temperature variations.

5 Benefits of Using an Ice Truck for Rent in Sumter

For business owners, managing funds and staying on top of costs is a crucial part of owning a profitable company. Purchasing and maintaining a fleet of refrigerated trailers can be a significant financial burden, requiring substantial capital investment and ongoing maintenance costs. However, renting refrigerated trucks can help businesses allocate their funds more wisely.

That's especially true for businesses that do not frequently engage in long-distance refrigerated shipping. Why purchase an entire vehicle and refrigeration system when you need the trailer for more minor tasks, like delivering flowers on Valentine's Day or storing products after an unexpected power outage? If you have a specific product line or a limited-time special, it's more practical to go with a refrigerated truck for rent than to purchase an ice truck outright.

In terms of the additional benefits of refrigerated trailer rentals, there's no shortage of them to highlight:

 Refrigerated Trailers Sumter, SC
 Remote Refrigerated Storage Sumter, SC
  • 01 No Maintenance Costs When you rent a refrigerated trailer, one of the biggest benefits is that you don't have to worry about expensive maintenance and repairs. If you were to buy a unit, it would only be a matter of time before you or a qualified professional would have to make repairs. At Sumter Refrigerated Trailer, all of our trailer rental options are well-maintained and up-to-date on repairs and updates.
  • 02 Cost-Effective When you buy an ice truck, you're making a long-term investment that may take a long time to pay off. When you rent, you're getting an immediate solution, which is better for your bank account when you only need the trailer for an abbreviated time.
  • 03 No Storage Costs What many folks don't think about when they buy a refrigerated trailer is that they will need someplace to store it when it's not in use. Often, that means paying even more money to rent a storage unit. With a refrigerated trailer for rent in Sumter, you can eliminate the expenses associated with storage units.
  • 04 Focus on Day-to-Day Business Obligations With an ice truck rental, you can concentrate on your core business activities instead of allocating resources towards managing a fleet of trucks and dealing with all the logistics involved.
  • 05 Refrigerated Space Catered to Your Needs Renting a refrigerated trailer from CRT means you have the flexibility of booking a short or longer-term trailer rental. That can be very helpful, especially for growing businesses and events that might have changing needs from month to month.

Sumter Refrigerated Trailer Pro Tip

 Refrigerated Transportation Sumter, SC

Looking for a spot to practice towing and trailering? Practicing these maneuvers in an empty parking lot is an excellent idea. It's always better to learn the movements of your trailer in empty spaces, so you can avoid any mishaps like trying to back up and park in front of a busy store.

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Refrigerated Trailer FAQs

At Sumter Refrigerated Trailer, we're big proponents of giving our customers plenty of information. That way, they can make informed purchasing decisions and know how to better operate our ice truck rentals. To keep yourself educated, keep these FAQs in mind:

  • Q. Does CRT provide power cords for refrigerated trailer rentals? a. 1 - 100ft Cord Provided.
  • Q. What type of plug do I need for towing your trailer? a. You'll need a regular 120v plug within 100 feet of the trailer
  • Q. Is it OK to store goods in the trailer rental? a. Yes, absolutely. We'll even provide you with a padlock for extra safety!
  • Q. Do I have to clean up when I'm done using the refrigerated trailer rental? a. Nope! Once you return your rental or we pick it up, we'll clean and sanitize the unit from head to toe.
  • Q. I need both a freezer and a refrigerated trailer rental. Can you help? a. Our refrigerated trailer rentals are both coolers AND freezers. Depending on your requirements, we can regulate the temperature from 0 to 50 degrees F.

The Top Choice for Refrigerated Trailer Rentals in South Carolina

Renting a refrigerated trailer just makes good sense for many businesses in Sumter and the metro area. That's why Sumter Refrigerated Trailer proudly serves South Carolina and the Lowcountry with refrigerated and frozen transportation rentals. If you're looking for the reliability, convenience, flexibility, and cost-effectiveness of a refrigerated trailer for rent in Sumter, look no further than CRT.

phone (843) 296-6617

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Latest News in Sumter, SC

Sumter's 'uncommon patriotism' one reason why residents think it's home to the most vets per capita in the SC. Here's what else they say.

SUMTER, S.C. — The military population is large in the South Carolina Midlands, but one county stands out. The recently released 2022 US Census Bureau data shows Sumter County has the most veterans per capita out of all the counties in the state."The people in the area just have a true love for you," veteran Leffor...

SUMTER, S.C. — The military population is large in the South Carolina Midlands, but one county stands out. The recently released 2022 US Census Bureau data shows Sumter County has the most veterans per capita out of all the counties in the state.

"The people in the area just have a true love for you," veteran Lefford Fate said, smiling. "It just makes it better."

Fate served as command chief at Hulburt Field in Florida before moving to Sumter for Shaw Air Force Base in 2008. When it came time to retire, Fate decided to stay. Now, he works as Sumter support services director.

"People in Sumter get it," Fate said. "I've been to a lot of places. I was in the Air Force for 31 years. I've traveled around the world, and this is the single greatest place that welcomes military people."

It's part of why Fate says recent data from the American Collection Survey makes sense. The data shows that out of all the counties in South Carolina, Sumter has the most veterans per capita at 13.2%, with 76,401 veterans.

"Businesses look at census data to see if a community is growing," Sumter Project Manager Jason Stoddard said. "If we can show that we're growing community and that our average and median income levels are healthy and improving, then I think we see more businesses look at the community to come here, and so we improve quality of life. I read a report that said the military community out at Shaw Air Force base but also including retirees and veterans, are spending over $33 million a year at basically restaurants. Well, you know, that's a huge investment in the community. But also you think about hospitality tax and how that can generate funds for improving quality of life for things tourism-related."

According to a 2022 Economic Impact of South Carolina's Military Community report by the South Carolina Department of Veteran's Affairs, the Sumter region has an annual economic impact of $2.5 billion. The report shows that 16,916 jobs were supported by the military community, which generated $1.1 billion in labor income.

Stoddard is a veteran himself and said he helped with the 2020 census outreach awareness and education efforts.

"Businesses look at that census data to see if they want to open new stores, factories, restaurants, you know, in that community so we wanted to show we were a growing community so we could attract new businesses," Stoddard said.

"Sumter's motto is 'uncommon patriotism,' and I truly feel that they show it," said Sumter American Legion District 11 Commander Peter St. Onge. "Because the way they cater to the military around here, programs, VA clinics…the city itself, the civilians, they serve the military and the veterans. And it is uncommon to find that. There is a lot of towns where the veteran community just falls into the background, but here at Sumter, Shaw having a big impact in the Sumter economic plan; they kind of cater to each other."

It's a feeling that Pennsylvania native Jack Lonergan credits for his decision to stay in Sumter after a 22-year career in the Air Force. Lonergan now serves as the American Legion Department of South Carolina's Third Vice Commander and the American Legion Dalzell-Shaw Post 175 Commander.

"Cost of living, employment. I mean, I actually thought about moving to the beach when I retired from my next career, but I mean, my cost of living….my mortgage is lower than what a homeowner's association fee would be in a lot of places. So cost of living is number one, employment opportunities number two, the way Sumter treats the military personnel is fantastic. You don't get… I've never seen that type of relationship," Lonergan said. "To be able to belong someplace, that made me want to retire here, is I could go into certain businesses in Sumter, and the respect that I get because I'm a veteran is just phenomenal. It really makes you feel like you're part of the family."

"I mean, just that the leaders of this town, you know Murrell Smith is the Speaker of the House, he's from Sumter. So many of these guys truly believe in helping veterans and being part of their community," St. Onge said. "Sometimes when you go to Washington and stuff like that, you see some of it. It's just more of a photo op. But here, they truly believe it, and it's genuine. It's nice to see."

The census data was released in December and gives a one-year look at 2022 and a five-year overview from 2017 to 2022.

Fate said he believes Sumter's continued support of the veteran population comes down to communication.

"The city needs things. We need workers, we need leaders, we need all of that," Fate said. "So we need to be able to tell the people from the base what we need and want, right? And then they need to tell what they need and want and we just come together and have a conversation."

USC students bring untold history of Sumter, S.C., to the public

Public history student Stevie Malenowski spent his summer job surrounded by boxes of documents that had not seen the light of day in decades.Years of furniture pamphlets, corporate memos and yellowing photos tell the story of Williams Furniture Company, a major employer in Sumter, South Carolina, from the 1920s through 2004. Malenowski’s task was to sort through the collection and scan some 1,200 items for digital preservation.He was excited to learn from the specialists at University Libraries, who taught him standards f...

Public history student Stevie Malenowski spent his summer job surrounded by boxes of documents that had not seen the light of day in decades.

Years of furniture pamphlets, corporate memos and yellowing photos tell the story of Williams Furniture Company, a major employer in Sumter, South Carolina, from the 1920s through 2004. Malenowski’s task was to sort through the collection and scan some 1,200 items for digital preservation.

He was excited to learn from the specialists at University Libraries, who taught him standards for digitization and how to create a finding guide. He was less excited, though, to learn more about lumber.

“Honestly, the last thing I wanted to do was read more about wood products,” says Malenowski. “But the great thing about history is that the more you look into things, you see these characters start to emerge.”

Malenowski came to the project after taking a graduate class with history professor Jessica Elfenbein, who has been working to create a more complete historic record of forestry in South Carolina. In researching the industry in Sumter, known as part of the “wood basket of the world,” Elfenbein learned about the Williams Furniture Company archives at Sumter County Museum.

The museum loaned the archives to USC for digitization, and the collection is now available online through the South Carolina Digital Library.

“It’s amazing to think that all this history has been largely unknown until now,” Elfenbein says. “You’d never know that the ‘Williams’ in Williams-Brice Stadium is named for this furniture company in Sumter, or how the community there rallied to bring the factory to town. It was truly a community effort, and these are stories that are very important but little-known.”

Malenowski has also gone all-in on researching Williams and stayed on into the fall semester to complete the digitization project. He’s using the archives for his graduate thesis, which examines the impact of unionization on the culture of the Williams Furniture Company and the surrounding community.

“There’s so much to unpack in just this one area,” he says. “Having a union shop with an integrated workplace at this time was practically unheard of in the South, and it’s incredible how the union played a role in changing the social fabric of the town.”

Elfenbein hopes making the archives available will bring greater awareness of the far-reaching impact of this industry for the history of Sumter, South Carolina and beyond.

Last fall, Elfenbein taught an undergraduate honors course to feature the Williams collection. Lynn Robertson, longtime director of USC’s McKissick Museum, co-taught the course and led the class in creating a traveling exhibit that will debut later this year.

“All the students are from different academic backgrounds — business, science, the arts and, of course, a few history majors,” Robertson says. “What’s so great is that they all bring their own backgrounds, so they all look at it from different points of view.”

The course showed students just how relevant history can be as the students worked together to bring this untold history to the public for the first time.

In addition to creating exhibition displays, they worked in teams to conduct the first seven oral histories, which provide context for the archive materials and a different angle on the company’s story.

“Initially, I thought this class was completely unrelated to me, but I was wrong,” says Lauren Reasoner, an honors student in the College of Information and Communication. “Not only am I getting to professionally design the exhibit, but I also learned how to conduct oral histories, which turned out to be a crucial part of my senior thesis.”

Reasoner interviewed a Sumter resident whose grandfather sustained a devastating injury while working in Williams’ lumber yard, which shed new light on the company’s worker safety records. Other students talked with descendants of past owners and managers of Williams.

These interviews are now transcribed and housed in the Department of Oral History in University Libraries. Malenowski, along with another student, will continue the interviews this spring, thanks to grants from the College of Arts and Sciences Humanities Collaborative and USC’s Center for Integrative and Experiential Learning.

While the Williams collection is extensive, he says it offers an incomplete view of the company’s story without the perspectives of those who worked on the factory floor.

“The Williams collection is insightful, but it’s got such obvious blind spots. The workers are practically invisible, and you’d think the managers were the ones out there chopping down trees and building cabinets,” Malenowski says. “But we’ve finally gotten a list of people who want to share their stories.”

View the Williams collection online, or learn more about the Sumter County Museum. The exhibit will travel to locations throughout the state later this year. A comprehensive website, including content from the traveling exhibit, will launch in April.

First South Carolina student accepted into Coast Guard Academy for upcoming year comes from Sumter

Eriyonna Walcott is a senior at Sumter High School. According to the Coast Guard Academy, only one South Carolinian has been accepted so far this year.More VideosSUMTER, S.C. — It's college acceptance season for students nationwide, and in Midlands, one high school senior has found out she's going to the Coast Guard Academy. The Sumter High School student is the first and only Sou...

Eriyonna Walcott is a senior at Sumter High School. According to the Coast Guard Academy, only one South Carolinian has been accepted so far this year.

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SUMTER, S.C. — It's college acceptance season for students nationwide, and in Midlands, one high school senior has found out she's going to the Coast Guard Academy. The Sumter High School student is the first and only South Carolinian to be accepted this year so far.

"Since I was probably like five or six years old, I just wanted to go to military," 17-year-old Eriyonna Walcott said. "My uncle, he's an officer in the Coast Guard. He retired as a commander in the Coast Guard, and I've always looked up to him my whole life. So, that just really inspired me to join the Coast Guard and be an officer."

Walcott said this inspiration and her school's ROTC program helped her confirm she wanted to join the military. Initially, Walcott said she planned to enlist right after high school graduation.

"I've never been the type of person to want to go to college or anything. That didn't happen 'til last year, late summer," Walcott said. "Ms. Gadson from seventh grade up until my 11th grade year summer, she's been juggling with me trying to convince me to go to college, so you know, Gear Up has really helped me. She made sure my grades were on point, my head's on the right track and all that type of stuff."

Because of Gear Up Counselor Audrika Gadson, Walcott is now the first person from South Carolina to be admitted into the Coast Guard Academy for 2024.

"You got kids who never thought they were gonna go to college accepted and ready to go," Gadson said, smiling. "Like, that's amazing."

Gadson has been working with Walcott and the Sumter High Class of 2024 for the past six years, making a difference, said principal Anamaria Sandor.

"The support they have received from the Gear Up specialist, it made a difference because they were exposed to more college options, to FAFSA, to meetings that they have with all the students to make sure that they know how to apply to the college, what letters they need, what recommendation, who to ask for recommendation," Sandor said.

"Makes me want to cry," Gadson said. "You know, you get a relationship with kids and, you know, you see so many kids never thought they were going to go even they just did, 'My path was strictly military,' you know, being able to talk to a child, be like, 'You know, well, you know, there's other options, you can still go to college and still be in the military at the same time.' You know, just introducing them to things that they never thought was possible and didn't know that exists, it's amazing."

The Academy said that only one person in the state has been accepted so far. In 2023, the Academy said only five students from South Carolina were accepted.

"It was either the Academy or the military. So, I feel like if you're determined to do something, you can make it happen. You have to believe in yourself and do everything you can," Walcott said. "ROTC - it helped develop my leadership skills and my responsibility. There's a lot of stuff in ROTC to help you with time management, all that type of stuff."

In addition to her school's JROTC program, Walcott said she's involved in many other extracurriculars, from the color guard and drill team to wrestling, swimming, track and National Honor Society.

"Another thing that got me here is all my support system. So, you know, my parents got number one, my principal, you know, everybody; they just kept encouraging me. So I really appreciate that," Walcott said. "If you go to college, you get more benefits, higher pay, that type of stuff. It's just a lot more benefits. I will get commissioning rather than enlisting. So yeah, I was like, you know what, maybe they're right. Let's do it."

Florence man charged in $80,000 chicken heist in Sumter County

SUMTER, S.C. (WIS) - An $80,000 chicken heist was foiled in Sumter County and a truck driver was taken into custody.According to the Sumter County Sheriff’s Office (SCSO), Christopher Thomas, 55, was supposed to deliver 41,000 pounds of chicken to two locations in Milton, Georgia, but had other plans to make cash.”I don’t know how you get $80,000 worth of chicken out of the plant in the first place,” said an anonymous worker at Pilgrims Pride Plant.Sumter County deputies along with the assistance ...

SUMTER, S.C. (WIS) - An $80,000 chicken heist was foiled in Sumter County and a truck driver was taken into custody.

According to the Sumter County Sheriff’s Office (SCSO), Christopher Thomas, 55, was supposed to deliver 41,000 pounds of chicken to two locations in Milton, Georgia, but had other plans to make cash.

”I don’t know how you get $80,000 worth of chicken out of the plant in the first place,” said an anonymous worker at Pilgrims Pride Plant.

Sumter County deputies along with the assistance from Lee County Sheriff’s Office arrested Thomas on Saturday evening.

According to the SCSO, Thomas — who is from Florence — was hired by Pilgrim’s Pride to deliver chicken and is suspected of having intentions of selling it.

WIS spoke to a worker at the plant who said this news comes as no surprise as these types of thefts keep happening.

”I’m not entirely sure how this is happening to be honest,” the worker said. “That’s a lot of chicken to be stolen out of there twice so I really have no idea how they’re even doing it and what they’re doing to stop it.”

Investigators believe Thomas sold part of the load of chicken he was transporting in various locations and was in the process of selling more when deputies pulled him over for a traffic stop.

When Thomas gave consent to deputies to search the truck, the investigator saw pallets loaded with cases of frozen chicken which was confirmed to be stolen from Pilgrim’s Pride.

Thomas was arrested with approximately seven pallets loaded with 215 cases of chicken that weighed 8,000 lbs.

It is believed Thomas sold about 33,000 lbs. of chicken.

Thomas is charged with breach of trust with fraudulent intent and is valued at $10,000 or more.

The worker gave insight into what the company could do to better manage the security of the plant.

“I guess the checkpoint to make sure on who’s coming in and out, what’s on the trucks and all of that,” the worker said. “I have no idea on how they get the trucks out there cause usually there’s these big trucks with freezers in them so I’m guessing they have one of those.”

If found guilty, Thomas can spend up to 10 years in prison.

Thomas appeared in court on Monday morning and was granted a $50,000 bond, but has yet to pay it.

In May, WIS News 10 reported on a similar incident in the same county where two men were arrested after being accused of stealing $40,000 worth of boneless chicken breast from Pilgrim’s Pride. However, investigators said the two crimes are not connected.

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47 years of Christmas lights: Sumter couple sets up holiday display on front yard for 47th year

Charlie Dubose has been collecting Christmas figurines and lights for almost five decades and sets up a big display every year for residents to drive by.SUMTER, S.C. — Sumter residents are lining up in their cars to drive by a Christmas display that’s been growing for nearly five decades.“There's just something about Christmas lights. It come from when I was a little boy, the first time I ever plugged up a set of Christmas lights. Wh...

Charlie Dubose has been collecting Christmas figurines and lights for almost five decades and sets up a big display every year for residents to drive by.

SUMTER, S.C. — Sumter residents are lining up in their cars to drive by a Christmas display that’s been growing for nearly five decades.

“There's just something about Christmas lights. It come from when I was a little boy, the first time I ever plugged up a set of Christmas lights. When I plugged them lights up, it made me click as the fella says. It just lit me up,” lifetime Sumterite Charlie Dubose smiles. “It just thrills me to look at them.”

It’s why Dubose and his wife Susan have been collecting figurines and lights for 47 years, placing them outside his home.

“No matter what I do here, it’s coming from my heart,” Dubose shares. “That’s where it's coming from.”

Dubose says he starts setting up in September.

His display has been growing every year, covering his 10 acres and spreading Christmas cheer to residents who drive by and to Dubose’s neighbors like Ginny Miller.

“I mean, it's funny to watch the traffic coming in and out, in and out all the time.,” Miller details. “But it's alright.”

Miller says dealing with traffic near her home during the month of December is worth it to see the joy that Dubose spreads.

“Just everybody come by and enjoy,” Miller explains. “I mean it's a beautiful setup he has.”

“Some kids that come by here, when they see this,” Dubose says. “That is gonna be the only Christmas is what they see.”

Kids and adults can see the lights every night starting Thanksgiving.

On the weekends, there’s a special visitor.

Santa Claus comes to say hello to visitors and takes letters from them.

For Dubose, two things motivate him to bring back the display every holiday season.

“Giving them joy and telling them about Christ,” Dubose says. “That's the main thing: that Jesus loves them. That's what I tell them.”

You can see those lights from 5:30 to 9 p.m. every weekday at 115 Gaddy Ct. On weekends, they stay on until 10 p.m.

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